Rooms

ROOM #1

The iron beds, recovered from the attic of the family Villa, required a long and patient restoration: thanks to my sister Claudia who, with her talent, has given new life to the painted lunettes.
Adriano, my architect father, designed the wardrobe and the Kinderheim, the box that houses a collection of vintage Kinder eggs surprises.

The rhino is a masterpiece of arte povera, bought in Zimbabwe; it’s a little bruised because my nephews have been playing with it for years.

RATE

Euro 150 per night and per room, including breakfast with locally sourced products.
Signature loom-woven towels have been created for la Serra by Guri I Zi. The project, born in the homonym Albanian town to enhance local textile craftsmanship, now employs 53 women. The toiletries, in collaboration with the nearby Farmacia Dolomiti, are produced by Unifarco: a Belluno company that supplies the major Italian and European pharmacies.

ROOM #2

The room overlooks a large terrace designed in the early twentieth century by my grandfather Alberto, himself also an architect, when he created the conservatory.

I am particularly fond of the simple beds, as they belonged to my parents and come from their Belluno home.

I bought the armchair at a flea market and upholstered it with Rubelli’s fabric Campiello; the slightly risqué photo on the desk, itself a family piece, comes from a stall in Palermo.

RATE

Euro 150 per night and per room, including breakfast with locally sourced products.
Signature loom-woven towels have been created for la Serra by Guri I Zi. The project, born in the homonym Albanian town to enhance local textile craftsmanship, now employs 53 women. The toiletries, in collaboration with the nearby Farmacia Dolomiti, are produced by Unifarco: a Belluno company that supplies the major Italian and European pharmacies.

Common spaces

KITCHEN-DINING AREA

The furniture from my Milanese flat, designed by my father, has found a new home at la Serra.

The extendable table is a prototype, that he had designed for an exam. Cassina’s “Carlotta” armchair sits in front of the Stube and is my cat Minerva’s favourite spot.

The big armchair comes from a Paris market: after years in a classic black and white zebra, it has found a new style with Osborne & Little’s “Serengeti” fabric.

LIVING ROOM

The place of honor is occupied by the great, plush armchair. It was my maternal grandmother’s favorite: when I “met” it for the first time it was dark green, then with my parents it became yellow, until it reached its latest upgrade to Rubelli’s sumptuous “Manin” upholstery.

The table and the Liberty display cases also come from my grandparents’ dining room. I have re-upholstered the chairs – to the great disdain of my mother: “They had always been white!” –  with Rattoppato and Punteggiato, designed by Giò Ponti for Rubelli. Mom then changed her mind.

I bought the carpet on the wall in Beirut. The plaster head on the column is the portrait of Tomaso Buzzi, architect and friend of grandfather Alberto – as was Giò Ponti.

THE CONSERVATORY

With its 5 windows overlooking the garden and the fireplace, this is the relaxation area par excellence and also a great alternative to the dining room for breakfast or a cup of tea.

THE CONSERVATORY

With its 5 windows overlooking the garden and the fireplace, this is the relaxation area par excellence and also a great alternative to the dining room for breakfast or a cup of tea.

The Borough

La Serra is located in the historic heart of Frontin, a handful of houses in the middle of the countryside. As per the tradition, everything revolves around the eighteenth-century Villa. The Villa does not stand out for its monumental architecture but for its color, which is a typical Venetian characteristic. The yellow of the Villa façade compliments the bright red of the Red House (once used as a shelter for horses and carriages) in the nearby square – onto which la Serra also overlooks – and of the Casetta Rossa. Despite its elegant appearance, which could suggest a chapel, the latter was a cabinet-making workshop turned children’s playroom.

The curved facade of la Serra, with its terrace and large windows, was built in the early twentieth century by grandfather Alberto, an architect, to house lemons and oleanders during the winter. At the back of la Serra there is the large common courtyard, with houses, barns and stables.

The stables once were home to cows and sheep, today the only guests are an old donkey, hens and rabbits.